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Category Archives: NQT

01 
Feb

Preparing for a teaching interview – some sample questions

When you are  preparing for a teaching interview, running through some possible interview questions will help your chances of success. You’ll be able to practice answers that will inevitably come up, and you can feel comfortable when you do eventually face the panel. Although there’s no way of knowing what you’ll be asked, there are some topics that are bound to come up.

Remember to back up your answers with examples wherever you can, even if you’re not asked to, and focus on the results that your actions achieved. The panel will refer to your CV, so make sure you know it well and you’re prepared to elaborate on the items on it.

Run through the questions below and see which areas of your interview repertoire need some work. Once you’re confident, ask a friend if they’ll stage a mock interview with you.

 

Suitability for the role

  • Why did you apply for this particular role?
  • Why did you choose to teach this particular age range?
  • What are your core strengths?
  • What are your weaknesses?
  • What can you bring to the role that other candidates may not bring?

 

The school and staff

  • What makes a successful school?
  • What importance do you attach to co-operation with colleagues, such as those who are teaching parallel classes?
  • How would you cope with a lack of enthusiasm from colleagues?
  • What is your impression of the school/organisation?
  • How do you feel about parent helpers in the classroom?
  • How would you work with a teaching assistant in your classroom?
  • Do you find it difficult working alongside older, more experienced staff?
  • What is the most difficult piece of feedback you have ever had to give, and why?
  • How would you react if a senior member of staff queried or criticised some aspect of your teaching?

 

Teaching and learning

  • What is your understanding of high quality teaching and learning
  • Describe a good lesson
  • Describe a lesson that did not go well. What were the reasons for this?
  • If I came into your classroom, what would I see?
  • Describe the teaching method you find most effective
  • How would you organise teaching and learning for a mixed-age group?
  • Do you differentiate between outcome or task?
  • What are the important things to consider when setting up a classroom?

 

Ensuring progress

  • What assessment strategies would you use?
  • How do you ensure all children are involved?
  • How do you assess and record your children’s progress?
  • How would you motivate a reluctant child?
  • How would you meet the needs of gifted and talented children in the class?
  • Have you had experience of a very high attaining and very low attaining child in your class?
  • Tell us about your experience of assessment for learning and assessment of learning
  • If a child doesn’t show signs of improvement after all your planning, monitoring, assessing etc, what do you do next?
  • What strategies do you use to manage children with special educational needs?

 

Behaviour management

  • What behaviour management policies have you experienced, and what do you consider as having been effective?
  • How would you deal with a pupil who is not co-operating?
  • How would you deal with a disruptive child?
  • What do you think is the best way to motivate pupils?
  • Some people say you should demand respect from children. Do you agree or disagree, and why?
  • What do you understand by the term ‘providing support’ for the pupil?
  • Bullying is often a serious issue that has to be dealt with in all areas of work with children. In your experience, what is the best way to deal with it?

 

Child protection issues

  • Have you ever felt uncomfortable about a colleague’s behaviour towards children in a previous job?
  • What were your concerns, what did you do, and how was the issue resolved?
  • Safeguarding children is an important part of our work. Can you give me same examples of how you would contribute to making the organisation a safer environment for children?
  • Tell me about a time when a child or young person behaved in a way that caused you concern. How did you deal with that? Who else did you involve?
  • Why do you want to work with children? What do you think you have to offer? Give an example of how children have benefited from contact with you.
  • How did your previous organisation tackle child protection?

 

Career development

  • How will you develop yourself as a professional teacher?
  • What is your understanding of effective performance management?
  • What are your plans for the future?
  • How would you like to see your career develop?
  • Are you prepared to go on courses?
  • How long do you expect to stay here?
  • Would you aim to widen your experience by seeking posts in other schools after a reasonable period here?

 

Again, this is just a set of sample questions, but it’s a pretty comprehensive one – so please use it.

 

Good Luck !

Readmore..

Published Date: 1st February 2018
Category: Key Stage Supply, NQT, Supply Teaching


 

28 
Jul

NQTs and Career Progression

We know that your first year of teaching is a very busy one, and that you will still be developing your subject knowledge, teaching style and methods of planning and assessment. However, there is no harm in thinking about what comes next, and career progression does not have to be something for the distant future. Teachers who are pro-active about moving on to leadership early in their careers can move up the ladder very rapidly

For all you Newly Qualified Teachers who were lucky enough to secure positions this year (or last year)and who now have an eye to the future, here are a few tips:

  • Never forget your core purpose, which is high quality teaching and learning, and keep that in mind in every conversation with student. parents and staff. Teachers who are focused on excellence will make a favourable impression on everyone they encounter in school.
  • Work hard, but be happy! It is important to be resilient if you are to progress to a leadership position.
  • Seek opportunities to speak publicly to adults (not just children!) This will not go unnoticed, as it shows you are willing to take on the more potentially unnerving aspects of a leadership role.
  • Take your development seriously. Consider starting an extra-curricular club, take advice from experienced colleagues, join a governing body and start to read about leadership – taking care to balance all this with your teaching commitments.

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we are always keen to place NQTs in their first long-term position, as we have done so for hundreds of candidates over the years. To find out more about registration and the work we have available, call Catherine on 01254 507210.

Readmore..

Published Date: 28th July 2017
Category: NQT


 

28 
Mar

NQT open days in Blackburn and Chorley!

NQTs! We have open days in our Blackburn and Chorley branches coming up!

This is an opportunity to drop in and get your registration with Key Stage started for work in the Summer term. It is also well worth dropping in if you are not yet finished with your training and are looking for September work. Our lovely, friendly Consultants will be on hand to have a chat with you and get the process started. Also, since it’s Easter, there may well be chocolate….

Chorley open day – Tuesday 11th April
Blackburn open day – Wednesday 12th April

Address details for both branches here: https://www.keystagesupply.co.uk/contact-us/

If you would prefer to call ahead and book an interview slot, please call Catherine on 01254 507210.

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Published Date: 28th March 2017
Category: Blackburn, Chorley, Lancaster, NQT


 

09 
Mar

Newly Qualified Teachers at Key Stage Teacher Supply

We are coming to the time of year when trainee teachers are completing their studies – some of you will finish in April and many more in June or July, and we know that right now you are looking for your first teaching positions.

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we are always keen to work with NQTs, and to help you find your first position. We have day-today and long-term work available all year round for primary and secondary supply teachers. We are conscious that you are keen to complete your induction period, and over the years we have placed hundreds of candidates in positions where they have gained valuable experience and completed that final stage of their training. We work with over 300 local school and nurseries across Lancashire and Cumbria, and they are all keen to work with staff who have fresh, up-to-date training and a great enthusiasm to get started with their careers!

If you are an NQT, and you are interested in registering with us, please call Catherine on 01254 507210.

Readmore..

Published Date: 9th March 2017
Category: NQT, Supply Teaching


 

09 
Dec

NQTs and Career Progression

We know that your first year of teaching is a very busy one, and that you will still be developing your subject knowledge, teaching style and methods of planning and assessment. However, there is no harm in thinking about what comes next, and career progression does not have to be something for the distant future. Teachers who are pro-active about moving on to leadership early in their careers can move up the ladder very rapidly

For all you Newly Qualified Teachers who were lucky enough to secure positions this year (or last year)and who now have an eye to the future, here are a few tips:

  • Never forget your core purpose, which is high quality teaching and learning, and keep that in mind in every conversation with student. parents and staff. Teachers who are focused on excellence will make a favourable impression on everyone they encounter in school.
  • Work hard, but be happy! It is important to be resilient if you are to progress to a leadership position.
  • Seek opportunities to speak publicly to adults (not just children!) This will not go unnoticed, as it shows you are willing to take on the more potentially unnerving aspects of a leadership role.
  • Take your development seriously. Consider starting an extra-curricular club, take advice from experienced colleagues, join a governing body and start to read about leadership – taking care to balance all this with your teaching commitments.

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we are always keen to place NQTs in their first long-term position, as we have done so for hundreds of candidates over the years. To find out more about registration and the work we have available, call Catherine on 01254 507210.

Readmore..

Published Date: 9th December 2016
Category: Key Stage Supply, NQT


 

07 
Jun

NQTs – A survival guide…

For everyone coming to the end of their teacher training right now, we have compiled a little survival guide, focusing on different areas of concern for NQTs. All this is based on our long experience in education (over 16 years), and it all applies whether you are on casual supply or in long-term work. Take a look:

In the school:

  • Be familiar with key school policies
  • If unsure about anything,, never be afraid to ask – sounds obvious, but it’s really important.

In the classroom:

  • Treat pupils as individuals – learn names quickly and try your best to build relationships by getting to know them
  • Find out at the very beginning who has SEND or medical needs, and what works best for them – ask your SENCO
  • Have the very highest expectations for behaviours and learning from the outset – it sets the tone for the whole term/year.

Behaviour:

  • Model the behaviour you want to see by being courteous at all times
  • Be firm, fair and approachable
  • Always remain calm in the face of poor behaviour, and never take it personally (or give any indication that  you have taken it personally)
  • Always follow the whole-school behaviour policies – it promotes consistency across the school and children like to know where they stand
  • Try to respond proportionately to both positive and inappropriate behaviour – over-praising good behaviour and work in certain children can build resentment in those children who are taken for granted because they are ‘always good’.

General considerations:

  • Invest in the relationship with your mentor and establish mutual expectations from the outset
  • Remember you are not alone – if you experience difficulties, share them with your mentor, colleagues or union representative
  • Pursue all CPD opportunities
  • Actively listen to pupils and colleagues – it’s a graet tool for learning and improving!

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we love to meet and work with NQTs and experienced teachers alike, as everyone brings something unique to our schools and their students. If you would like more information about supply teaching in Lancashire and Cumbria, call Catherine on 01254 507210. We have branches in Blackburn, Chorley and Lancaster, serving over 300 local schools, nurseries and colleges.

Readmore..

Published Date: 7th June 2016
Category: NQT


 

16 
Mar

Honing NQT interview skills at Haslingden High School

This Friday, 18th March, our Managing Director Jane will be attending a ‘mock interview’ session at Haslingden High School, to assist Newly Qualified Teachers on the Schools Direct programme. The session will focus on the skills NQTs need to secure their first position – and how best to ‘sell’ the skills and experiences they have acquired on the Schools Direct training route to prospective employers.

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we are very keen to assist NQTs in launching their teaching careers. Be it through events like the one on Friday, or working directly with candidates registered to our agency, we love to help NQTs secure their first position.

With offices based in Blackburn, Chorley and Lancaster, we work with over 300 schools across Lancashire and Cumbria. We have 15 years experience of supporting NQTs as they launch their careers, and we look forward to helping even more teachers in 2016.

To find out more, please call Catherine on 0125 507210.

Readmore..

Published Date: 16th March 2016
Category: NQT


 

03 
Nov

Student Teachers and NQTs – A Survival Guide

It’s true that many new teachers will finish their training in summer. However, with more and more flexible routes available, such as Schools Direct, distance-learning PGCEs and Teach First, there will be plenty of teachers beginning their careers in the new year, or at Easter. For those, we have compiled a little survival guide, focusing on different areas of concern for NQTs:

 

In the school context:

  • Be familiar with key school policies
  • If unsure about anything,, never be afraid to ask – sounds obvious, but it’s really important.

 

In the classroom context:

  • Treat pupils as individuals – learn names quickly and try your best to build relationships by getting to know them
  • Find out at the very beginning who has SEND or medical needs, and what works best for them – ask your SENCO
  • Have the very highest expectations for behaviours and learning from the outset – it sets the tone for the whole term/year.

 

Behaviour:

  • Model the behaviour you want to see by being courteous at all times
  • Be firm, fair and approachable
  • Always remain calm in the face of poor behaviour, and never take it personally (or give any indication that  you have taken it personally)
  • Always follow the whole-school behaviour policies – it promotes consistency across the school and children like to know where they stand
  • Try to respond proportionately to both positive and inappropriate behaviour – over-praising good behaviour and work in certain children can build resentment in those children who are taken for granted because they are ‘always good’.

 

General considerations:

  • Invest in the relationship with your mentor and establish mutual expectations from the outset
  • Remember you are not alone – if you experience difficulties, share them with your mentor, colleagues or union representative
  • Pursue all CPD opportunities
  • Actively listen to pupils and colleagues – it’s a graet tool for learning and improving!

 

Here at Key Stage Teacher Supply, we love to meet and work with NQTs and experienced teachers alike, as everyone brings something unique to our schools and their students. If you would like more information about supply teaching in Lancashire and Cumbria, call Catherine on 01254 507210. We have branches in Blackburn, Chorley and Lancaster, serving over 300 local schools, nurseries and colleges.

Readmore..

Published Date: 3rd November 2015
Category: NQT, Supply Teaching


 

20 
Jul

Considering Supply? Here’s why it’s a great choice for NQTs!

As a former teacher myself, I can easily relate to the Newly Qualified Teachers who we interview on a daily basis. Our NQTs of 2014 have various success stories of working via Key Stage Teacher Supply; whether that is in day-to-day bookings or long-term placements. Some of them are even completing their Induction period at schools we work with.

It’s NOT TOO EARLY to get signed up with us, schools are already talking to us about their supply needs for September 2015 and we have vacancies for day-to-day bookings right up until Summer 2015 just after you have finished your placement. The work is flexible; we will work around your remaining assignments, placement days, interviews and social activities in the areas and locations you can get to.

When I completed my PGCE, I worked with a supply agency in order to widen my experience with schools. Supply work gives you an opportunity to see which schools you enjoy and which you’d be happy to accept a permanent job offer from. I developed my behaviour management strategies and assessment methods by working on supply, and also picked up various lesson plans and marking strategies which more experienced teachers were seeing success with. I talked with other teachers, who I would not have otherwise been introduced to had it not been for supply work; this allowed me to ‘pick the brains’ of more senior teachers and also met other recent NQTs who I shared tips and advice with. You’ll get a range of ideas and experience with displays, planning, classroom organisation and behaviour management for when you accept a permanent job in September 2015 or beyond.

I quite quickly built up a “supply bag”, which included lesson plans, stickers, USB drives with various online links/videos to support my plans, various coloured pens for marking, worksheets (for all ages) and a SatNav (VITAL!!) This enabled me to take day-to-day bookings from a couple of weeks in advance to those last minute sickness calls confidently.

We often hear mixed feedback from our teachers about other agencies, so we know there are a few myths out there with supply teaching and agencies. I will try to answer the Frequently Asked Questions we get and dispel the myths below:

Q. Do I have to go to a school if you ask me to?

A. No! You are completely free to say “yes” or “no” as you please. If you particularly like a school, then let us know and we’ll get you back in there. If you don’t want to go to a school due to location or a previous experience, then please pass this on and we won’t ask you about that school again.

Q. Do you take a ‘cut’ of my daily pay?

A. No! Whatever we agree as your daily pay, we will pay you every penny of that. We don’t take a cut of your daily pay whatsoever.

Q. Do I have to pay for a new DBS?

A. Short answer is yes unless you have already signed up to the DBS Update Service. We highly recommend doing this as it’ll mean you won’t ever have to pay for a DBS again. We charge a standard £44 for a new DBS (we don’t make a single penny on this), which will allow you to work on supply. Please ask me if you have any questions about the Update Service.

Q. Can I work on supply before I get my QTS certificate?

A. Yes, we can place you into schools with the school’s permission in a variety of roles as soon as you have finished your final placement. This works particularly well when your placement schools ask for you back on supply via Key Stage.

Q. Do I need to give you any notice if I accept a permanent job?

A. No. Just call us to tell us, we will congratulate you and stop calling you for supply work. It’s as easy as that, you won’t be bound in any contract with us whatsoever.

We work with a wide range of schools in:

  • Wigan
  • Chorley
  • Bolton
  • Warrington
  • St Helens
  • Ormskirk
  • Southport
  • Leyland
  • Preston
  • Blackburn
  • Burnley
  • Lancaster
  • Kendal
  • Barrow

 

Please ask your placement school(s) about us, ask the question “would you book me on supply if I was to register with Key Stage?” And see what response you get, you’ll be able to be paid to go back into your placement school(s)!

If you need to contact me, please email me directly at mark@keystagesupply.co.uk or speak to Catherine Byrom, our Resource Co-ordinator and also a former teacher on 01254 507210 or email catherine@keystagesupply.co.uk

https://www.keystagesupply.co.uk/

We look forward to hearing from you.

Readmore..

Published Date: 20th July 2015
Category: NQT


 

29 
Apr

Supply Teaching as a Newly Qualified Teacher – is it for me?

As a former teacher myself, I can easily relate to the Newly Qualified Teachers who we interview on a daily basis. Our NQTs of 2014 have various success stories of working via Key Stage Teacher Supply; whether that is in day-to-day bookings or long-term placements. Some of them are even completing their Induction period at schools we work with.

It’s NOT TOO EARLY to get signed up with us, schools are already talking to us about their supply needs for September 2015 and we have vacancies for day-to-day bookings right up until Summer 2015 just after you have finished your placement. The work is flexible; we will work around your remaining assignments, placement days, interviews and social activities in the areas and locations you can get to.

When I completed my PGCE, I worked with a supply agency in order to widen my experience with schools. Supply work gives you an opportunity to see which schools you enjoy and which you’d be happy to accept a permanent job offer from. I developed my behaviour management strategies and assessment methods by working on supply, and also picked up various lesson plans and marking strategies which more experienced teachers were seeing success with. I talked with other teachers, who I would not have otherwise been introduced to had it not been for supply work; this allowed me to ‘pick the brains’ of more senior teachers and also met other recent NQTs who I shared tips and advice with. You’ll get a range of ideas and experience with displays, planning, classroom organisation and behaviour management for when you accept a permanent job in September 2015 or beyond.

I quite quickly built up a “supply bag”, which included lesson plans, stickers, USB drives with various online links/videos to support my plans, various coloured pens for marking, worksheets (for all ages) and a SatNav (VITAL!!) This enabled me to take day-to-day bookings from a couple of weeks in advance to those last minute sickness calls confidently.

We often hear mixed feedback from our teachers about other agencies, so we know there are a few myths out there with supply teaching and agencies. I will try to answer the Frequently Asked Questions we get and dispel the myths below:

Q. Do I have to go to a school if you ask me to?

A. No! You are completely free to say “yes” or “no” as you please. If you particularly like a school, then let us know and we’ll get you back in there. If you don’t want to go to a school due to location or a previous experience, then please pass this on and we won’t ask you about that school again.

Q. Do you take a ‘cut’ of my daily pay?

A. No! Whatever we agree as your daily pay, we will pay you every penny of that. We don’t take a cut of your daily pay whatsoever.

Q. Do I have to pay for a new DBS?

A. Short answer is yes unless you have already signed up to the DBS Update Service. We highly recommend doing this as it’ll mean you won’t ever have to pay for a DBS again. We charge a standard £44 for a new DBS (we don’t make a single penny on this), which will allow you to work on supply. Please ask me if you have any questions about the Update Service.

Q. Can I work on supply before I get my QTS certificate?

A. Yes, we can place you into schools with the school’s permission in a variety of roles as soon as you have finished your final placement. This works particularly well when your placement schools ask for you back on supply via Key Stage.

Q. Do I need to give you any notice if I accept a permanent job?

A. No. Just call us to tell us, we will congratulate you and stop calling you for supply work. It’s as easy as that, you won’t be bound in any contract with us whatsoever.

We work with a wide range of schools in:

  • Wigan
  • Chorley
  • Bolton
  • Warrington
  • St Helens
  • Ormskirk
  • Southport
  • Leyland
  • Preston
  • Blackburn
  • Burnley
  • Lancaster
  • Kendal
  • Barrow

 

Please ask your placement school(s) about us, ask the question “would you book me on supply if I was to register with Key Stage?” And see what response you get, you’ll be able to be paid to go back into your placement school(s)!

If you need to contact me, please email me directly at mark@keystagesupply.co.uk or speak to Catherine Byrom, our Resource Co-ordinator and also a former teacher on01254 507210 or email catherine@keystagesupply.co.uk

https://www.keystagesupply.co.uk/

We look forward to hearing from you.

Readmore..

Published Date: 29th April 2015
Category: NQT